fbpx

Wedding presents

Back when people moved into their first home when they got married, wedding presents weren’t an issue. A toaster. A half-dozen wine glasses. A casserole dish. Linens. Cutlery. Anything went. But today, most people have lived together before they get married. They already have a house together (a joint 30-year mortgage is the new engagement) and so need little by way of stuff. So what to give?

Back in the 13th century, King Dinis I of Portugal set a trend. When his wife, Queen Isabel, visited the village of Óbidos, she fell in love with it. He, having the kingdom at his disposal, gave it to her as a wedding present. The precedent set, the heirs to the throne followed suit, bestowing the lovely town on their brides. Until 1883, the town was owned by the current queen of Portugal. That’s one for the sisters.

Today, it’s a popular day trip for tourists staying in Lisbon and its surrounds. The lovely medieval town is made for postcards and chocolate box lids. It’s gorgeous. At various stages it was home to the Romans, the Visigoths, and the Moors, before being taken by the first king of Portugal in the twelfth century. The castle is remarkably together and towers over the little town, with its cobblestone streets, and floral walkways.

It’s quite a hub of activity year-round with a chocolate festival in March,  its famous Holy Week festivities at Easter, and an Ancient Music festival in October. It has one of the world’s first hotels in a historical monument (the castle) and a tableau of eateries, one looking better than the next. Some 3100 people live here now and it probably gets half that again in visitors every day.  Definitely worth a visit if you’re in the vicinity. Worth going out of your way for, too.

IMG_6178 (800x600)IMG_6181 (600x800)IMG_6185 (600x800)IMG_6127 (800x600)IMG_6128 (600x800)IMG_6135 (599x800)IMG_6138 (600x800)IMG_6139 (800x600)IMG_6140 (800x600)IMG_6141 (800x600)IMG_6146 (800x600)IMG_6151 (800x547)IMG_6152 (600x800)IMG_6156 (800x600)IMG_6164 (600x800)IMG_6169 (800x600)IMG_6190 (800x600)IMG_6192 (800x600)IMG_6193 (800x600)

 

Share:

Never miss a post

Sign up here to get an email whenever I post something new.

More Posts

Zalaszabar, Hungary, again

First-time visitors are easy. For them, everything is new. Repeat visitors are a tad more problematic. Don’t get me wrong. It’s great to see different

Szent György hegy, Hungary

The name Szent György hegy loses its magic in translation. The mundane St George’s hill doesn’t do justice to the beauty of the basalt homeland

Truth from the Cockpit

I miss travelling. I miss planes. And airports. And even RyanAir’s annoying we’re-ahead-of-schedule-but-only-because-we-buffered-the-timetable bugle call. Worse still, it’s taking me longer and longer to conjure

Dining with Pigeons in Southwestern Hungary

Unlike in Irish, the names of Hungarian villages and towns and cities don’t always translate into English. On the odd occasion that they do, they

3 Responses

      1. No but has been added to my list……….aside of anything it looks very similar to one of my favorite places on earth – Portmerion. The tiles are interesting, I was in Cadiz last year ( a bit further down the coast in Spain) and there was extensive use of similar tiles in the old town there.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: