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Maltese cemetery

Maltese cemetery

Some people celebrate their birthdays in style. Some ignore them completely. Others still, like my mate GB in Malta, visits a Maltese cemetery. He’s not fussy about which one; as long as he gets to a cemetery on the day, he’s happy. He’s been doing it for years; he says it’s life-affirming.

Maltese cemeteryMaltese cemetery

I can relate to that. I have a thing or three for cemeteries, for the perspective they give and the calm they offer. Last week I visited GB’s favourite – Ta’Braxia – in part because I wanted to escape the madness, and in part because my mate Lori’s second anniversary was coming up and I needed to connect.

Maltese cemetery

I hadn’t realised that back in 1915, Malta was treating the sick and wounded from military campaigns in Gallipoli (billed as one of the Allies’ great disasters of WWI) and the little-known Salonika, when in October 1915 a combined Franco-British force of some two large brigades was landed at Salonika (today called Thessalonika) at the request of the Greek Prime Minister. The objective was to help the Serbs in their fight against Bulgarian aggression. From these two campaigns, over 135,000 wounded found their way to Malta. It’s little wonder then, that nearly every Maltese cemetery is full of foreign-sounding names.

Maltese cemetery

Fast forward to WWII. While it was never invaded, Malta was bombed… and bombed… and bombed. Such was her perseverance in the face of adversity that in April 1942, the island and her people were awarded the George Cross by King George VI.

In Ta’Braxia cemetery, about 2 km outside of Valletta,  lie many of those who fought in both wars. I was struck by some of the inscriptions.

Maltese cemetery

And another that simply said: Life’s work well done. Now come to rest. That’s something I wouldn’t mind being able to say with a measure of honesty when my time is up.

Some died of fever, others had drowned. More still were the wives and children of serving military from Ireland, England, Scotland, Wales, and France. While the men were remembered for their bravery, the women were remembered for their roles. One headstone in memory of Georgina read: The good and faithful wife of Mr John Sullivan, head-master of H.M. Dockyard school, Malta. She was just 25 when she died.

It was a lovely day; just the right sort of weather to visit a Maltese cemetery. And we had the place to ourselves, apart from a gardener or two. There’s a lot to be said for taking the time to stop and pay your respects, particularly to those who gave their lives so that we might live in a better world.

It was a manic week entailing lots of people-time. I’m physically and emotionally wrecked. I miss Lori terribly and wonder how much she can see from where she is. I’m grateful though for whatever it was that planted this appreciation for cemeteries in me and for that need I feel to spend time with the dead. Some might think it morbid, but like my mate GB, I find it life-affirming.

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2 Responses

  1. Excellent observation, Mary! Not many people know this but…we have similar pastimes/pursuits…visited the Commonwealth War Graves in Benghazi once and was struck by the inscription on one of the headstones of a young lad, aged 19: “we cannot say, we will not say, that he is dead, he is just away”.

    And I guess you must have read Gray’s Elegy?

    Hope life in Budapest is treating you well.

    1. Well you’ve certainly let the cat out of the bag Francie – so much for keeping that secret 🙂 Am doing well, doing well. The lovely Ms Heneghan departs our shores next week. Budapest will be all the quieter without her. Thought you might have made it over while she was here… Hope all’s well in your world and that life is treating you kindly.

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2 Responses

  1. Excellent observation, Mary! Not many people know this but…we have similar pastimes/pursuits…visited the Commonwealth War Graves in Benghazi once and was struck by the inscription on one of the headstones of a young lad, aged 19: “we cannot say, we will not say, that he is dead, he is just away”.

    And I guess you must have read Gray’s Elegy?

    Hope life in Budapest is treating you well.

    1. Well you’ve certainly let the cat out of the bag Francie – so much for keeping that secret 🙂 Am doing well, doing well. The lovely Ms Heneghan departs our shores next week. Budapest will be all the quieter without her. Thought you might have made it over while she was here… Hope all’s well in your world and that life is treating you kindly.

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