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And yet another Budapest discovery

One of the many reasons I like living in this city is its discoverability. Just when I think I’ve seen it all, I find somewhere new or I hear about somewhere new or I’m taken somewhere new. Some weeks ago, having failed to secure entry to the Alumni etterem beside the College of Commerce, BA and myself found ourselves wandering the streets looking for a cup of coffee. We happened upon Bedő Ház, a lovely Art Nouveau café on Honvéd utca just off Szabadság tér and around the corner from Kossuth Lajos tér. The entire building (apartments currently for sale upstairs)  was designed by Emil Vidor and built in 1903 and is now a fitting showcase for Hungarian Secessionist interiors. It’s heaving with all sorts of furniture, china, paintings, posters, and other items from the period.

It’s as if all your great-aunts got together and put all their furniture in the one room. Having coffee there is like stepping back in time. A wonderful experience. And, if the mood takes you, you can buy tickets for the museum and explore the maze of other stuff on display. ‘Twas enough for me to take a wander downstairs to the loo and see the anteroom.

There are some curious font-like things hanging on the wall and the second time I visited, I polled the women to see what they thought they were. Urinals? Holy Water fonts? or just ordinary water fonts?  Any sort of hybrid is simply unimaginable.

As you sit quietly (it’s certainly a place that evokes a sense of gentility – more of a polite chuckle than a raucous belly laugh) enjoying the surrounds, your eye catches more and more detail. The hazi limonade is tangy and the coffee isn’t half bad. I can’t say I’ve tried the pastries, but they look good enough to eat. Well worth a visit if you’re in the vicinity and yet another place to add to your ‘what do to with visitors’ list. And when you’re outside, look up and check out the sunflower detail in the ironwork on the balcony. Am coveting…

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